The Importance of Aftercare in Addiction Treatment

The Importance of Aftercare in Addiction Treatment

You have completed an inpatient treatment program and now you’re cured! Unfortunately, that is not the case. There is no known cure for addiction however there is treatment and rehab is only part of that treatment.

Statistics and common sense dictate that the longer someone receives treatment, the better their success rate at achieving and maintaining sobriety. This is where the importance of aftercare in addiction treatment comes into the picture.

What is Meant by Inpatient Rehab?

Inpatient rehab, or residential, refers to the stage of addiction treatment that involves staying in a facility and receiving intensive therapy. Inpatient treatment is the first step of addiction treatment and usually lasts for about 30 days.

What is Meant by Aftercare in Addiction Treatment?

Aftercare refers to further interventions and treatment that follow rehab. It is additional support that is given following completion from the residential part of the program. Aftercare in addiction treatment can take many forms and can be any combination of these forms of support that involve teaching new skills and coping strategies.

The Importance of Aftercare in Addiction Treatment

The importance of aftercare in addiction treatment becomes clear in its results: people who receive some type of aftercare are less likely to relapse and more likely to live longer. Aftercare in addiction treatment can help you to stay motivated and provide support when your journey gets a little bumpy. You will acquire knowledge and skills from the treatment facility but, the most important learning takes place during normal everyday living. Aftercare in addiction treatment will support you in finding new solutions as new problems in recovery arise. In this way, the importance of aftercare treatment becomes evident: you will bank new and effective coping strategies in the time you spend out of inpatient but while getting aftercare support.

Relapse and the Importance of Aftercare in Addiction Treatment

Unfortunately, relapse affects a great many in recovery. Relapse is not inevitable, though. It is known that people who have a strong aftercare treatment plan are more aware of their relapse triggers and so they are more likely to spot the warning signs that they are heading for a relapse. The importance of aftercare in addiction treatment when it comes to relapse patterns is that these preventive measures are the most effective at stopping a relapse in its tracks.

Types of Aftercare

Intensive Outpatient Therapy (IOP)

IOP is the perfect supplement to inpatient rehab because you get to attend individual and group therapy during the day and then have the afternoon and evening for getting back to work or enjoying hobbies or having simple down time. IOP is a good idea because you can continue therapy and the progress you were making while in rehab instead of abruptly stopping after completing treatment.

Halfway House/Sober Living Community

After completing an inpatient program, it is an extremely good idea to live in a halfway house or sober living community before returning home or getting your own place. Halfway houses, sober houses, and sober living communities provide a supportive environment where you live among other people who are staying sober and working towards their recovery. It’s a good stepping stone to rejoining society at-large: there is less structure than rehab but more structure than living alone.

12 Step Meetings and Other Support Groups

There are 12 Step fellowships and Non-Twelve Step groups who hold meetings as a form of a recovery-based support group where members can attend at no cost and share in their experiences with others like them. Members find empathy, encouragement, and even networking at these meetings.

Booster sessions

Former patients of a rehabilitation program are sometimes offered what is called “booster sessions” depending on the facility and its policies. Booster sessions are a way for recently graduated patients to continue to receive counseling once they have completed the program.

Private Counseling

Continuing previous or beginning new counseling and therapy with a private therapist is another form of aftercare. Counseling address issues relating to recovery and addiction as well as to a dual diagnosis such as depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder. A great many addicts also have a co-occurring mental illness.

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

http://www.dualdiagnosis.org/

Private rehab vs. State Funded Rehab

Private rehab vs. State Funded Rehab

The term “rehab” is short for the word rehabilitation and refers to a facility that offers treatment for drug abuse and addiction. Rehab sometimes includes a medical detox program that serves the purpose of helping alcohol- and drug-dependent people to ease completely off substances with less discomfort than going cold turkey, or stopping abruptly.  Another part of rehab is the inpatient program. This part of treatment involves therapy that addresses drug addiction behaviors and coping mechanisms to utilize in a sober lifestyle.

Funding

There are two types of rehabs: private rehab and state funded rehab. The main difference between these is the way in which the programs are funded.

Private rehab provides services by being funded either by out-of-pocket payment by the patient or by the patient’s health insurance plan. If you have private insurance through your employer or through your spouse’s or another family member’s employer, then more than likely you can attend a private rehab that is in-network with that plan and only have to pay a deductible, if the plan requires it. Some plans do not even have a deductible in which case you can attend a private rehab with no out-of-pocket cost to you.

State funded rehab is just that: its services are able to exist and be provided to those who cannot afford to pay for rehab or who do not have insurance with support of state funding through tax revenue and/or grants.

Services and Amenities

Another way in which private rehab and state funded rehab differs is in the quality and extent of the services that they provide.

Usually, private rehab offers many more amenities that can make your stay more comfortable. A private rehab provides a resort-like atmosphere with some “extras” besides room, board, and therapy. Oftentimes, they offer spa experiences, yoga, meditation, massage, acupuncture, chiropractic adjustments and so on.

State funded rehab provides adequate services that can help anyone get sober who is willing to do the work. It may not be as cushy as private rehab but it is sufficient and meets high standards of quality of care.

Types of Therapy

Both private rehab and state funded rehab offers therapy for substance abuse and addiction however, the type and intensity of the therapy differ between the two.

Private rehab offers alternative and holistic therapies such as Native American sweat lodges, music and art therapy, hypnotherapy, massage therapy, to name only a few. Private rehab also offers the industry standard of cognitive behavioral therapies in both one-on-one and group sessions.

State funded rehab also offer the widely accepted therapy approaches for substance abuse and addiction but often therapy sessions are in group settings because of funding and the growing demand for treatment by more and more people.

 

Other Considerations: Private Rehab vs. State Funded Rehab

You must be careful to do your research when considering a private rehab. Just because it is private does not mean that it is legitimate or accredited.

Because they must answer to state government and therefore taxpayers, state funded rehabs are strictly regulated. With state funded rehabs, at least you can be sure that treatment is uniform and meets industry standards.

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.drugabuse.gov/

http://en.wikipedia.org

Individual Therapy for Addiction

Individual Therapy for Addiction

Individual Therapy for Addiction

Treatment for addiction and alcoholism uses many different therapeutic approaches in order to achieve lasting sobriety for any and all people wanting to get sober. The therapies used in the treatment of addiction and alcoholism should cover two of the most important issues for an individual in recovery, post-acute withdrawal syndrome and denial. One of the most common therapies used for addiction is Individual Therapy. Individual therapy for addiction is said to give an individual the best change at staying sober one day at a time. Individual therapy allows a person to discuss, internalize, and develop critical skills that will be required to maintain sobriety for the rest of their life.

Individual therapy for addiction helps the individual work on skills such as:

Avoidance Skills – Individual therapy for addiction helps the addict or alcohol begin to understand what types of people, places and things to avoid as a part of relapse prevention. Avoiding anything that triggers them is vital to them staying sober.

Refusal Skills -Individual therapy for addiction helps the addict or alcoholic begin to develop the ability to say no to any situation that makes them feel uncomfortable. This is because individual therapy helps alcoholics and addicts develop confidence within themselves.

Coping Skills – Individual therapy for addiction helps the addict and alcoholic find new coping skills to stressful situations. Human beings are under constant stress and for newly recovering alcoholics and addicts this can be doubly so. Individual therapy for addiction helps the addict and alcoholic learn how to deal with daily stress without using.

Assertive Skills – Individual therapy for addiction teaches an addict and alcoholic to ask for what they need. Asking for help and making their voice heard is imperative to staying sober. This can be hard for addicts and alcoholics who have little to no self-esteem initially. Individual therapy helps them to find their worth and develop a better sense of self-esteem so they can ask for what they need.

Individual therapy for addiction really helps a person change negative thoughts and behaviors by exploring them and then individual therapy for addiction also helps change the underlying concepts that cause those thoughts and behaviors. For those with a dual diagnosis, for instance, depression as well as substance abuse, individual therapy for addiction may be used in accordance with a medication. Individual therapy is a way for addicts and alcoholics to lay out all their negative stuff and find newer and more positive ways of dealing with everything from the past, present to the future. Individual therapy for addiction works well for addicts and alcoholics because what is done is specific to each individual person and is not a broad therapy that encompasses general aspects. Individual therapy for addiction works on each unique person’s needs and goals so they can accomplish what they truly want more than anything else and that is long term sobriety.

By utilizing the tools given in individual therapy for addiction an addict and alcoholic will be on much better footing to not only recognize their relapse warning signs, move past post-acute withdrawal but also to step out of the fog of denial about their disease.

Sources: http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/counseling-and-addiction-how-therapy-can-help